Spring Release at Parma Ridge Winery


 
A really good release party at Parma Ridge Winery on April 18. Warm temperatures. Clear skies. Great food. Great wines. Here are the wines that were released and the Tapas we had. Left-Click any photo to see enlarged.

 

 

2018 Avielle. 100% Merlot. This Rosé is maned after Avielle, our fiery daughter with Strawberry Blonde hair. Enjoy notes of sweet honey and ripened strawberries with a crisp finish. [Blog Note: Don’t miss this one. It is superb!]
Paring: Crostini with Borsin, Crispy Prosciutto and Blackberry Compote.

 

 

2018 Tre Bianchi. 63% Gewürztraminer, 20% Riesling and 17% Viognier. Meaning “Three Whites” in Italian, this full-bodied white features pronounced citrus and melon notes.
Paring: Tempura Halibut Bites with Unagi Sauce.

 

2016 The Last Zin. 75% Merlot and 26% Zinfandel. “The Last Zin” is a final hurrah to our Zinfandel that perished in the hard-freeze of 2016. This estate-grown red is balanced with notes of wild blackberry, smooth tannins and a touch of charred caramel.
Paring:“The Rochester” – A Korean Chicken Slider with Arugula, Grilled local sweet Onions and Sriracha Aioli. [Superb!]

 
2016 Tempranillo. 100% Tempranillo. This Spanish Varietal features subtle spices, roasted red pepper and dried cranberry with a smooth oak finish.
Paring: Fresh Fried Chips and Chipotle Cheddar Dip wwith Smoked Chorizo and Filet Mignon Bites.

Great Feasts Coming to Parma Ridge Winery Bistro!


Join us this Weekend with Wonderful Wine, Fabulous Food and an Amazing View
We are open Wednesday & Thursday from 12-5 p.m. for Wine Tasting, Beer and our Small Bites Menu, Friday & Saturday 12-9pm and Sunday 11 am- 5 pm with our Full Bistro Menu, Wine Tasting & Beer.
Reservations Required for Dining from 5-9 p.m. Friday & Saturday.
You can now text us at 208-946-5187 to make a reservation.
[The Pork Chops and the Brisket pictured below are AWESOME! So is the Omelet. Left-Click the photos to see them enlarged.]

SAVE THE DATE! WINE CLUB RELEASE THURSDAY, APRIL 18 from 4-8 p.m.
2018 Avielle, Rosé of Merlot, $17 Retail, $14.45 Wine Club
2018 Tre Bianchi, Gewurztraminer, Riesling & Viognier, $18 Retail, $15.30 Wine Club
2016 The Last Zin, Merlot & Zinfandel, $28 Retail, $23.80 Wine Club
2016 Tempranillo, $34 Retail, $28.90 Wine Club
PLEASE RSVP via text at 208-946-5187 or email at info@parmaridge.wine with the time you will be coming. Cards will be charged beginning this week so please let us know asap if you have changes to your club or your card on file. Menu and prizes will be announced in the Wine Club email this week.

Easter Brunch and Special Menu, Sunday, April 21 from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Limited Reservations remaining — Make yours today!

Featured Specials:
Omlete a la Mason – $12.95
Folded Omelet with Eggs from Relk Farms, a Groves Country Mushroom Melange and Beecher’s Aged White Cheddar. Served with a Roasted Potato Medley of Peruvian, Baby Red and Yukon Gold with Crumbled Bacon

Braised Short Ribs – $24.95
Slow Braised Short Ribs with a Roasted Potato Medley of Peruvian, Baby Red and Yukon Gold with Sauteed Carrots and Fennel

Pork Chop au Poivre – $24.95
A Smoked and Seared Double Cut Pork Chop with a Brandy Peppercorn Creole Mustard Sauce, Fried Artichoke Hearts and a Roasted Potato Medley of Peruvian, Baby Red and Yukon Gold

We will be offering our regular menu and the new featured Spring items this weekend, Storm might also be adding a few specials of his own to practice for Easter Sunday!

Mediterranean Chicken Salad $10.95
Mixed Greens with Sun-Ripened Tomatoes, Currants, Golden Raisins, Thyme Roasted Artichokes, Beecher’s Aged White Cheddar and Marinated Chicken with a Zesty White-Balsamic Basil Dressing

Pear Salad – $9.95, with Grilled Chicken $12.95
Mixed Greens with Apple Cider Vinaigrette, Blue Cheese Crumbles and Poached Pear with a Slice of Grilled Baguette

Caprese Bite Appetizer $6.95
Lightly Toasted Baguette with Roma Tomatoes, Italian Basil, Buffalo Mozzarella and a Balsamic Reduction

Our Bacon Wrapped Prawns are back! Come try them this weekend
Jumbo Bacon Wrapped Prawn Appetizer $13.95
Char-Broiled Bacon Wrapped Jumbo Prawns with Cherry Chipotle BBQ sauce on a Bed of Spring Greens, 4 Prawns per order

Loaded Bowls $14.95
Choose between Rosemary Truffle Fries, Tater Tots or Fresh Fried Potato Chips

Poutine Bowl – House Made Demi-Glace, Local Fresh Cheese Curds, Sautéed Button Mushrooms & Applewood Smoked Bacon

Chipotle Cheddar Bowl – Tillamook Chipotle Cheddar Cheese Fondue with Filet Bites, Basque Chorizo, Crispy Bacon, Sautéed Jalapenos & Cilantro

Join us for Happy Hour Friday from 4-6 p.m.
$1 off Mimosas
$1 off Brock Lager
$7.50 Mesquite or Deluxe Sliders with beer, mimosa or wine purchase
$7.50 Personal Pepperoni, Sausage Mushroom or Fungi Flatbreads with beer, mimosa or wine purchase

Mother’s Day Brunch and Special Menu, Sunday, May 12 from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Make your reservation today
Special Weekend In April Ladies Luncheon & Crafting Event April 6th

Buy 2 Bottles get 1 Free on Wednesday & Thursday at Parma Ridge! Mention this ad to take advantage of this offer in our tasting room.

Ladies Luncheon & Crafting Event April 6th at Parma Ridge
Please join us for a Ladies Luncheon & Crafting Event with @therustyboard!
When: Saturday, April 6th 11:30 am.- 1:30 p.m.
Where: Parma Ridge Winery
So many 9×12 choices! Pick a Pallet Sign to make for $26, Box Frame for $30 or Framed Chalkboard for $35. Pick what you want it to say and then RSVP with Payment by March 23rd. Instant Message Amy Watts at (208) 921-7616 or wattsfamilyof6@gmail.com for google form & option to pay via a link to square account.
Parma Ridge will offer their full menu and wine, wine tasting and drinks so come hungry & thirsty!
Space is limited so register today.

LIVE MUSIC ON THE PATIO THIS SUMMER
These evenings are filled with fun! Enjoy excellent music, wine & beer and our fabulous cuisine. Our kitchen will remain open until 9 p.m. on nights we have live music. Reserve your spot today as space fills up fast!

Cunningham and Moss, Saturday June 1 & Saturday September 14 from 5:30-9:30 p.m.
Don Cunningham and David Moss team up for this dynamic acoustic Duo. A little Rock a little Roll and a whole lotta Soul. Two Guys Two Guitars. Read more about Cunningham and Moss Here.

The James Gang, Saturday, June 15th from 6-9 pm
James Barrett- Vocals, Rhythm Guitar
Rochelle Barrett-Lead Vocals
Ken Lynde- Lead Guita
Read More about The James Gang Here.

The RockIts, Saturday, June 29th from 6-9 pm
Our one and only Nikki Barrett is the lead singer of this band. This Rockabilly/Hillbilly Band is sure to entertain the crowd! Read more about the RockIts Here.

More Live Music Nights coming soon!

LIMITED QUANTITIES – STOCK UP NOW
2016 Reserve Syrah, Retail $34, Wine Club $28.90, less than 1 Case Left
2017 Reinhart Riesling, Retail $20, Wine Club $17.00, 17 Cases Left
2016 Reserve Merlot, Retail $35, Wine Club $29.75, 25 Cases Left
2017 LaRea Dolce, Late Harvest, Retail $28, Wine Club $23.80, 25 Cases Left
2016 Storm Red, Retail $35, Wine Club $29.75, 27 Cases Left
2016 Joshua Storm, Retail $32, Wine Club $27.20, 30 Cases Left
2016 Kenneth Storm, Retail $32, Wine Club $27.20, 37 Cases Left

Breakfast Sandwich

Sunday Brunch Specials
Breakfast Sandwich – $7.95
Bacon, Egg and Cheddar Breakfast Sandwich with Cheesy Bacon Fries
Best Ever Biscuits and Gravy – $7.95
Sausage Gravy over a Fresh Bacon Cheddar Biscuit topped with a Sunny Side Up Egg
Brunch Burger – $9.95
Quarter-Pound Burger with Melted Double Cream Brie, Applewood Smoked Bacon, and Sunny Side Up Egg with a Lemon-Tarragon Aioli and Rosemary Garlic Truffle Fries

We Bottled our 2018 Tre Bianchi, 2018 Avielle, Rosé of Merlot, 2018 Rhubarb Wine, and 2016 “The Bomb” – a blend of Cabernet, Malbec & Merlot last weekend. Watch the videos on our Facebook Page!

Have you seen the recent articles on Parma Ridge?

Parma Ridge was featured in the AAA Magazine, thank you Nathan Leigh for the write-up on our location!

“Settle in at Parma Ridge Winery, just southeast of Parma, Idaho, and on a clear day you might be able to see nearly 60 miles from east to west—a panoramic view of the whole lower Boise River Valley.” —Nathan Leigh

Have you seen the recent articles on Parma Ridge?
Parma Ridge was featured in the AAA Magazine, thank you Nathan Leigh for the write-up on our location!
“Settle in at Parma Ridge Winery, just southeast of Parma, Idaho, and on a clear day you might be able to see nearly 60 miles from east to west—a panoramic view of the whole lower Boise River Valley.” —Nathan Leigh

Parma Ridge was voted #1 Winery in Idaho By House Beautiful. See the line up here!

Have you seen the recent articles on Parma Ridge? Parma Ridge was voted #1 Winery in Idaho By House Beautiful. See the line up here!

Great article by By Andy Purdue and Eric Degerman of Great Northwest Wine on the Idaho Wine Industry. Parma Ridge made the list with our 2016 Dry Rose of Merlot – Read it here!
See you this weekend on the Ridge!
Cheers,

Steph and Chef Storm
Sous Chef and Assist Winemaker Megan Hartman

Parma Ridge Winery
24509 Rudd Road, Parma ID, 83660
208-946-5187
http://www.parmaridge.wine

 

 

Save the date for our Easter Special Menu — Make your Reservation today!
Try our new Mediterranean Salad with one of our Featured Specials

Japanese Special March Festival


I found this to be interesting. That’s probably because of my Cultural Anthropology background.

Hina Matsuri in Japan

Source: https://matcha-jp.com/en/753
Although it is not a national holiday, March 3rd is a special day for girls. Families who don’t have young daughters might not do anything special on this day.
March 3rd is Japanese Girls’ Day or Hinamatsuri. Ornate dolls are displayed in the family home to mark the beginning of spring and to wish good health and good fortune for all of the girls in the family.
However, a tradition of this festival is still passed down until now. Actually, how people celebrate Hina Matsuri is different from place to place. We will introduce here what the Japanese people usually do on this day.
Hina Dolls represent what the imperial family was like in the ancient times. The dolls on the top tire of the platforms represent the emperor and the empress. The rest of the dolls are three court ladies, five musicians and the minister of the Right and Left who used to support the government in the old days. There are some decorations such as Gissha (oxcarts), small cupboards, Japanese paper lamps called “Bonbori”, and orange and peach tree branches displayed on the tire of platforms.
The facial expressions and costumes of each doll are also different depending on their personality and position.
The special meals for Hina Matsuri are Amazake (sweet drink), Chirashizushi (a style of sushi) and Hina Arare (sweet colorful rice crackers).
Amazake is a traditional Japanese sweet and thick drink made from fermented glutinous rice. Amazake literally means “sweet alcohol” but it has less than 1 percent of Shirozake alcohol in it. So children are also able to drink it.

Shirozake
Drinking Shirozake, which is a traditional sweet sake, was one of the customs to get rid of bad things out from your body. But Shirozake is an alcoholic drink, so Amazake was made with the children in mind.
Hina Arare are colorful and cute small rice crackers. The colors of these rice crackers have meanings. White represents the earth of the winter, pink and red represent life, while green represents the green shoots in the spring. Hina Arare is a snack showing our expectations toward the arrival of spring after the long cold winter. People also say that you will live healthy for this coming year if you eat each color of Hina Arare.
Chirashizushi is a type of Sushi which has lotus roots, shrimp and thinly shredded egg omelet on the top of vinegar rice. It has been a dish enjoyed widely at celebrations.
The ingredients in Chirashizushi have meanings as well. The lotus root is said to give one the power to see what will happen in the future, shrimps are a symbol of longevity and so on.

Source: https://www.thespruceeats.com/japanese-girls-day-hinamatsuri-party-dishes-2031057
As with almost all holidays, food and drink play a role on Girls’ Day, with rice wine and rice cakes taking center stage, along with flower blossoms. Hinamatsuri is also called Momo no Sekku, which means a festival of peach blossoms. Peach blossoms, shiro-zake (white fermented rice wine) and hishi-mochi (diamond-shaped rice cakes) are placed on the stand with the hina dolls. Hishi-mochi are colored pink representing peach flowers, white representing snow, and green representing new growth.
Traditionally, girls in Japan invited their friends to a home party to celebrate this festival. Many people prepare a special meal for girls on this day, including savory dishes such as chirashi, which is sugar-flavored, vinegared sushi rice with raw fish on top; clam soup served in the shell; and edamame maze-gohan, mixed rice usually consisting of brown rice and soybeans.
Other popular dishes to serve at a Girl’s Day celebration are inari sushi—rice-stuffed tofu pockets—with miso grilled salmon and cabbage ramen salad. Sweets are on the menu as well, incorporating a feminine shade of pink, like chi chi dango, which are pink pillows of mochi (glutinous rice flour and coconut milk), a favorite among children, and sakura-mochi, a pink, sweet rice cake. Some families include an impressive edible centerpiece, such as the layered chirashi sushi cake.

Some recipes for Hina Matsuri
(The recipes listed below can be found at the link above.)

Chirashizuchi
Easy Seafood Chirashizushi: Use a shortcut of packaged sushi seasoning to quickly season steamed rice and add pre-cooked gomoku vegetables for this delectable dish. Add your favorite toppings of choice.
Edamame Maze-Gohan (Mixed Rice): Is easy to prepare, especially for large crowds. Steamed rice is mixed with furikake seasoning, bottled nametake (seasoned mushrooms), and shelled edamame for a delicious rice dish.
Inari Sushi: Preparing a dish for a large crowd doesn’t need to be complicated. Find out the secrets of making quick inari sushi with impressive results.
Cabbage Ramen Salad: This spin on the traditional Chinese chicken salad recipe uses crunchy dried ramen noodles, cabbage, and shredded chicken to create a zesty Japanese-fusion salad.
Slow Cooker Teriyaki Chicken Wings: Let your slow cooker do all the work to whip-up a batch of delicious teriyaki chicken wings with just a few ingredients, and use the free time to prepare a few other dishes.
Miso Ginger Marinated Grilled Salmon
Miso Grilled Salmon: Miso-grilled salmon can easily be prepared by making the marinade ahead of time and then letting the salmon marinade for a few days in the fridge. All you need is an oven or a grill to cook up delicious fillets in under 40 minutes.
Clam Soup: A traditional soup that is often enjoyed on Hinamatsuri is clam soup. This clear style soup is known as sumashijiru and is simply seasoned from the broth of the clams.
Chi Chi Dango: These pillowy soft bites of mochi are made of glutinous rice flour and coconut milk. These pink, soft mochi are an absolute favorite among children.
Sakura Mochi: Sakura mochi is a glutinous rice dish that is often enjoyed during Hinamatsuri. This slightly sweetened, pink mochi is filled with sweet red beans (koshian) and wrapped in a salted sakura (young cherry blossom) leaf.

Farm to Table Feast


And it was a good feast! Held at Peaceful Belly Farm and the new event room and building – Grand Opening November 16–18, noon until 6 pm.
The Farm to Table Dinner Series, “Josie of Peaceful Belly, Scott from Snake River Winery, Clay from Stack Rock Cidery, Nate Whitley chef at the Modern Hotel and Chef Abby Carlson have teamed up to create an amazing 5-course meal held on our magical Sunny Slope farm. The plates are creative, unique, and 100% local and seasonal. These dinners will transport you to another time and place where fresh food is cooked with amazing brilliance and presented to the table in a picturesque farm setting.” Here are some photos from the evening. Enjoy and Left-Click to see any of these photos enlarged. All in all – A good dinner.

Sunset at the farm.
The menu for the dinner.
New event room and tasting room.
Appetizer –

Fingerling Potato, Lentils and Onion

Smoked Trout
Warm Fingerling Potatoes
Buttermilk
Shallots
Arugula
2012 Arena Valley Riesling

Beef Tongue Carpaccio
Black Garlic Aioli
Roasted Chilis
Sunny Slope Cide
r

Roasted Winter Squash
Leeks
Kale
Brown Butter Tamari Vinaigrette
2014 Blauer Zweigelt

Reflections at the Intermezzo

Intermezzo
Pumpkin Pie Sorbet

Roasted Pork Loin
Onion Puree
Lentils
Tomato
Swiss Chard
2009 Reserve Bordeaux Blend

Tri of Ice Cream Sandwiches
2014 Orange Muscat

What’s In A Wine Glass?


Besides wine? Shape and form. An interesting article from SevenFifty Daily “In 1958 the Austrian glassmaker Claus Josef Riedel added a new wineglass to his catalog. With a large bowl and a gently flared lip, the Burgundy Grand Cru was specifically intended to hold Burgundy wines. At that time, a glass made for a particular wine was a first. According to Maximilian Riedel, a grandson of Claus and the current CEO of Riedel, until then nobody else had recognized that the “taste, bouquet, balance, and finish of a wine [could be] affected by the shape of a glass.” His grandfather, he says, “took notice [whenever] a slight change in his glassware made a change in what he was drinking.”

The Burgundy Grand Cru was followed by a line of 10 more wine-specific shapes: Alsace, Bordeaux Grand Cru, Chardonnay, Hermitage, Loire, Montrachet, Riesling Grand Cru, Rosé, Sauternes, and Zinfandel. Today, Riedel makes dozens of specialized glasses; the company’s 2018 catalog specifies which of dozens of shapes are appropriate for some 200 different wines, which include familiar grapes like Malbec and Sauvignon Blanc (in oaked and unoaked expressions); less familiar grapes, such as Bacchus and Zierfandler; appellations, like Hermitage; and styles, like rosé.

The idea that particular shapes are appropriate for particular wines has become so accepted that other makers of high-end glassware, such as Zalto and Gabriel-Glas, now differentiate themselves by explicitly offering “universal” glasses—wineglasses that are suited for drinking any kind of wine.”

There’s a lot more information from Examining the Science of Wineglass Shapes. This is really an interesting article that Robin found. Enjoy!

What is this thing called ….. Borscht?


I’m not sure that Cole Porter or Ella Fitzgerald would approve of the title, but I think it is appropriate. Keep reading.

“Borscht (English: /ˈbɔːrʃ, ˈbɔːrʃt/ ) is a sour soup commonly consumed in Eastern Europe. The variety most often associated with the name in English is of Ukrainian origin, and includes beetroots as one of the main ingredients, which gives the dish its distinctive red color. It shares the name, however, with a wide selection of sour-tasting soups without beetroots, such as sorrel-based green borscht, rye-based white borscht and cabbage borscht … Borscht derives from an ancient soup originally cooked from pickled stems, leaves and umbels of common hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium), a herbaceous plant growing in damp meadows, which lent the dish its Slavic name. With time, it evolved into a diverse array of tart soups, among which the beet-based red borscht has become the most popular. It is typically made by combining meat or bone stock with sautéed vegetables, which – as well as beetroots – usually include cabbage, carrots, onions, potatoes and tomatoes. Depending on the recipe, borscht may include meat or fish, or be purely vegetarian; it may be served either hot or cold; and it may range from a hearty one-pot meal to a clear broth or a smooth drink.” [Wikipedia] And “those other sour soups” that are cousins to borscht may come from day Lithuania and Belarus, the Ashkenaz Jews, Romanian and Moldovan cuisines, Poland, Armenia and even Chinese cuisine, a soup known as luó sòng tāng, or “Russian soup”, is based on red cabbage and tomatoes, and lacks beetroots altogether; also known as “Chinese borscht”. Wow! There are many varieties of borscht.

But there is only one original or authentic borscht. Borscht derives from a soup originally made by the Slavs from common hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium, also known as cow parsnip), which lent the dish its Slavic name. Growing commonly in damp meadows throughout the north temperate zone, hogweed was used not only as fodder (as its English names suggest), but also for human consumption – from Eastern Europe to Siberia, to northwestern North America.
And what is generally served with borscht? “Pirozhki, or baked dumplings with fillings as for uszka, are another common side for both thick and clear variants of borscht. Polish clear borscht may be also served with a croquette or paszteciki. A typical Polish croquette (krokiet) is made by wrapping a crêpe (thin pancake) around a filling and coating it in breadcrumbs before refrying; paszteciki (literally, ‘little pâtés’) are variously shaped filled hand-held pastries of yeast-raised or flaky dough. An even more exquisite way to serve borscht is with a coulibiac, or a large loaf-shaped pie. Possible fillings for croquettes, paszteciki and coulibiacs include mushrooms, sauerkraut and minced meat.” [The Book of Tasty and Healthy Food, Anastas Mikoyan]

So. What is borscht usually made of? What are the components? Ingredients? Borscht is seldom eaten by itself. Buckwheat groats or boiled potatoes, often topped with pork cracklings, are other simple possibilities, but a range of more involved sides exists as well.
In Ukraine, borscht is often accompanied with pampushky, or savory, puffy yeast-raised rolls glazed with oil and crushed garlic. In Russian cuisine, borscht may be served with any of assorted side dishes based on tvorog, or the East European variant of farmer cheese, such as vatrushki, syrniki or krupeniki. Vatrushki are baked round cheese-filled tarts; syrniki are small pancakes wherein the cheese is mixed into the batter; and a krupenikis a casserole of buckwheat groats baked with cheese.

But please note, your borscht may be different from your neighbors. There are cultural differences in the borscht. Ingredients may include,beet juice, beet root, veal, ham, crayfish, beef, pork, sour cream, buttermilk, yogurt, cucumbers, radishes, green onion, hard-boiled egg halves, dill weed, leafy vegetables, sorrel, spinach, chard, nettle, dandelion, cabbage, tomatoes, corn, squash, to name a few.

Our Borscht
So whatever inspired me to write this post? Well, we made a borscht and I posted a photo of it (the one pictured here actually) and I got comments. One of them in particular, from a Ukrainian lady, and she said,”That’s not real Russian Borsch (smiley face). It’s beet soup (smiley face). My mom makes the best, she is a Gourmet Chef for over 50yrs, and specializes in Jewish Cuisine.” [Mara Rizzio] I spoke to Mara – she makes awesome pirogies – and it was a good discussion. Thank-You Mara for “setting” me straight. Thus, this blog post. Cheers. And here is a recipe for Borscht that I found in the internet, from NPR, that includes various ingredients. Have fun! Borscht Recipe.

Berbere Spice Blend and Doro Wot – Chicken


Now is the time to add some spice to your life. At least the spices of North Africa – Ethiopia to be exact.

From Demand Africa, “In Amharic, the state language of Ethiopia, ‘barbare’ means pepper or hot. Not surprisingly, berbere spice, the flavor backbone of Ethiopian cooking, gives traditional Ethiopian dishes that fiery kick. Berbere’s constituent spice is paprika (itself a ground spice made from Capsicum peppers), but the final blend could be made from up to 20 spices.
Ethiopian cooks of old were not short of kitchen experiments, and over time have added garlic, ginger, fenugreek seeds, African basil, black and white cumin, nutmeg, cinnamon, clove, cardamom, coriander seed, thyme, rosemary, turmeric and ajwain (carom seeds commonly used in Indian cooking) to the mix. This allows berbere to impart a richer, aromatic and more layered flavor to any dish it’s added to, whether Ethiopian or not…Amharic language scholars speculate that the name ‘barbare’ came from ‘papare,’ the Ge’ez word for pepper (Ge’ez was the language of ancient Ethiopia). While that is likely lost in the mists of time, the more probable theory is that berbere came at a point in Ethiopia’s history when the independent Axumite kingdom controlled the Red Sea route to the Silk Road. The Axumites knew the secrets of the monsoon winds, and harnessed it to send their ships toward India in summer, and back again to Africa in winter…Berbere is the cornerstone spice blend of Ethiopia; without it, ‘doro wot’ or chicken stew (Ethiopia’s national dish) would not have that distinctive brick-red appearance and rustic, savory intensity.
Doro wot is cooked during traditional festivities and is typically served with injera, fermented sourdough flatbread with a slightly spongy texture that serves as the plate and scooping utensil for the stew. Doro wot is ladled generously on top of it and served alongside vegetables and other dips. (To eat injera, Ethiopians pinch off a piece of it and use the same to scoop out a small portion of the stew.)”

You can buy the spice blend in your grocery store – our Albertsons carries it – but it is more fun to make your own. All of these spices should be locally available.
Berbere Spice Mix
Prep Time: 5 min Total Time: 5 min
Ingredients:
1/2 c Chili Powder
1/4 c Paprika
1/2 t ground Ginger
1/2 t ground Cardamon
1/2 t ground Turmeric
1/2 t ground Coriander
1/2 t ground Fenugreek
1/4 t ground Cinnamon
1/4 t grated fresh Nutmeg
1/4 t ground Allspice
11/8 t ground Cloves
1/8 t fresh ground Black Pepper
Directions:
In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Store in an airtight jar.

Ethiopian cuisine (Amharic: የኢትዮጵያ ምግብ) characteristically consists of vegetable and often very spicy meat dishes. This is usually in the form of wot, a thick stew, served atop injera, a large sourdough flatbread, which is about 20 inches in diameter and made out of fermented teff flour.

A recipe from African Bites for
Doro Wat
Ethiopian Chicken Stew -slowly simmered in a blend of robust spices. Easy thick, comforting, delicious, and so easy to make!
Prep Time: 20 mins Cook Time: 1 hr Total Time: 1 hr 20 mins Servings: 6
Calories: 470 Author: Immaculate Bites
Ingredients:
3 Tablespoons Spiced butter Sub with Cooking oil or more
2-3 medium onions sliced
1/4 cup canola oil
2 Tablespoons Berbere Spice (See above)
1 Tablespoon minced garlic
½ Tablespoon minced ginger
3- 3½- pound whole chicken cut in pieces or chicken thighs
1 Tablespoon tomato paste
½ Tablespoon paprika
1 Tablespoon dried basil optional
4-6 Large soft-boiled egg shelled removed
1-2 Lemons Freshly Squeezed (adjust to taste)
Salt and pepper to taste
Directions:
Season chicken with, salt, pepper and set aside
In a large pot, over medium heat, heat until hot, and then add spiced butter and onions, sauté onions, stirring frequently, until they are deep brown about 7 -10 minutes. After the onions are caramelized or reached a deep brown color, add some more oil, followed by berbere spice, garlic, and ginger.
Stir for about 2-3 minutes, for the flavors to blossom and the mixture has a deep rich brown color. Be careful not to let it burn.
Then add about 2-3 cups water .Add chicken, tomato paste, paprika, basil, salt and cook for about 30 minutes.
Throw in the eggs and lemon juice; thoroughly mix to ensure that the eggs are immersed in the sauce.
Continue cooking until chicken is tender about 10 minutes or more Adjust sauce thickness and seasoning with water or broth, lemon,salt according to preference.
Serve warm